Thursday, 05 October 2017 11:33

Marijuana legalization reality now hitting home

Written by  Andrea Carol
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On one hand, Health Canada has proposed a trans-fat ban, outlawing the main source of artificial trans fats in our diets.
On the other hand, the nation faces the reality of the legalization of marijuana.


Research indicates a trans-fat ban could prevent up to 12,000 heart attacks in Canada over 20 years. 
What does the research indicate about long-term Cannabis use?
Whether you agree with it or not, legalization of marijuana could be a reality for Canadians.
The Government of Canada has implied legalization as the next step. There are relevant concerns from the medical community of the effects of marijuana on adolescents.
“My concern is with the non-medicinal use of cannabis by adolescents,”explained Dr L Byker, Medical Doctor, a former Swift Current physician and a member of Royal College of Psychologists.
“Cannabis use has a clear established association with poor scholastic performance, increased risk of not completing high school, decreased odds of obtaining a university degree, higher risk of becoming dependent on social welfare, increased risk of cannabis dependence, of other recreational drug use, motor vehicle crashes, psychiatric illness and suicide. This goes beyond the obvious respiratory effects of chronic inhalation of combustion productsIn one hand, Health Canada has proposed a trans-fat ban, outlawing themain source of artificial trans fats in our diets.
“On the other hand, the nation faces the reality of the legalization of marijuana. Research indicates a trans-fat ban could prevent up to 12,000 heart attacks in Canada over 20 years.  What does the research indicate about long-term Cannabis use? Whether you agree with it or not, legalization of marijuana could be a reality for Canadians. and its well-established risk of developing chronic lung disease.”
Young developing brains exposed to cannabis have marked negative effects.
Even though “weed” is said to produce relaxation, it can increase anxiety if higher amounts are consumed.
There is growing evidence that regular use of marijuana could double the risk of developing a psychotic episode.
Even though it is thought that marijuana is not addictive, evidence now suggests that it can be.
It is legal in the Netherlands and cannabis users there formed the largest group among those who entered treatment in 2015.
Likely, the legislation will prohibit youth from using it legally, but the exact age after which these effects seem minor is unknown.
Moreover, cigarettes and alcohol are illegal before a certain age, but that doesn’t seem to stop anyone underage from using them.
With the normalization of recreational drug use we may be up against a monstrosity of long-term problems.
The Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis Report published by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) released in January 2017 states, “Research has shown that youth are unclear on the effects and harms of cannabis, which could put them at an increased risk for use (Johnston, O’Malley, Miech, Bachman, & Schulenberg, 2015).
This fact is concerning as brain development and mental health can be compromised if cannabis use, particularly frequent use, is initiated in early adolescence (George & Vaccarino, 2015).
The World Health Organization compared past-30-day cannabis use among youth aged 15 across 40 countries and found that use by Canadian youth was the second highest of the countries surveyed (13%), being surpassed only by France (15%) (World Health Organization, 2014).
This rate of use illustrates the need for a better understanding of the misconceptions and attitudes Canadian youth have towards cannabis”.
With conflicting predictions regarding the influence of decriminalization of cannabis use, the long-term effects are simply risky.
Canadians are on the precipice of massive change in the illicit drug world and it is uncertain whether we are prepared for the worms in the can we are about to open.

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