Friday, 08 June 2018 06:19

Government of Canada commemorates the national historic significance of Cypress Hills Massacre

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Dr. Jim Miller, Saskatchewan Member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada unveiled the commemorative plaque May 31 at the Fort Walsh Interpretive Centre with members of the Carry the Kettle Nakoda Nation. Dr. Jim Miller, Saskatchewan Member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada unveiled the commemorative plaque May 31 at the Fort Walsh Interpretive Centre with members of the Carry the Kettle Nakoda Nation. Photo courtesy Parks Canada

On June 1st, 1873, a group of American wolf hunters attacked a Nakoda First Nations camp resulting in the massacre of Elders, warriors, women and children at a place known as Cypress Hills.


Dr. Jim Miller, Saskatchewan Member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC), commemorated the national historic significance of the Cypress Hills Massacre on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Catherine McKenna.
A May 31 plaque unveiling ceremony, organized in collaboration with members of the Carry the Kettle Nakoda Nation, was held today at the site.
The Cypress Hill Massacre remains a pivotal event in Nakoda history and its lands continue to be held sacred by the Nakoda people. The commemoration of this tragic event as a place of national significance will ensure that the Nakoda victims are remembered.
The massacre was also one of the first major tests of law enforcement in Western Canada as the federal government dispatched the North-West Mounted Police to investigate the tragedy.
The determination of the North-West Mounted Police to prosecute crimes against Indigenous peoples was important in establishing peaceful relations between the Indigenous peoples of the Prairies and the federal government.
The Government of Canada is committed to connecting Canadians to the significant people, places, and events that shaped our country’s history. The Government has recently announced funding for Parks Canada to incorporate Indigenous views, history and heritage into national parks and historic sites. This is part of the Government’s commitment to implement the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.
Parks Canada is committed to working in partnership with Indigenous peoples to recognize, commemorate and share Indigenous histories. Working together with more than 300 Indigenous communities across Canada, Parks Canada and Indigenous peoples are partners in conserving, restoring, and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.
“The Government of Canada is committed to a renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples, based on a recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership. On behalf of the Government of Canada, we remember the tragedy of the Cypress Hills Massacre and we commemorate its national historic significance. National historic designations commemorate positive and negative aspects of Canada's history and prompt us to contemplate the complex and challenging moments that helped define Canada today. By sharing these stories with Canadians, we hope to foster better understanding of Canada’s history.” explained Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada in a statement.

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