Wednesday, 06 July 2016 10:25

MHC ‘50 Acts’ importance and effects multiplied

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November (50 Acts) Medicine Hat College counsellor Tobi Ceh reacts to the first buzz for the head shaving by McCoy student Lily-Jean Cradduck with fellow student Kirstyn Weinrauch watching. November (50 Acts) Medicine Hat College counsellor Tobi Ceh reacts to the first buzz for the head shaving by McCoy student Lily-Jean Cradduck with fellow student Kirstyn Weinrauch watching.

In the 2015-16 academic year, the Medicine Hat College celebrated its 50th anniversary.


There were numerous celebrations and activities, but maybe none as important as the 50 Acts of College. The initiative saw staff, students and alumni assisting with the generation and execution of philanthropic ideas to help the region, the city and the student body itself.
With June 30 having come and past, the 50 Acts program is now complete, but not without some looking back at how well it unfolded.
It started with 50 backpacks being filled with school supplies for elementary and high-school students from the area for the United Way’s Tools for School campaign.  
There were other projects such as picking up trash from the shorelines of Seven Persons Creek and the South Saskatchewan Rivers; Brooks Campus’ food bank challenge; free lab time for unemployed welders, and members of the senior executive Council serving food at an appreciation of regional volunteers in May at the Foremost/Bow Island Family and Community Volunteer Appreciation Evening.
Colleen Graham, co-ordinator, marketing and communications for Medicine Hat College, says the effort, sacrifice and enthusiasm was worth it.
“It’s anecdotal, but what I hoped it would bring was to generate some positive feeling outside the school and also within. I definitely thought it did that,” Graham says.
She hopes to determine how many volunteer hours contributed to the school-year-long project.
Graham knows what the initiative did do was allow the college to form new partnerships or solidify previous ones.
“There was never any shortage of ideas, but what we worried about was volunteer fatigue amongst (internal) staff,” explains Graham who says they didn’t want staff to feel compelled to always have to donate financially.
“People were doing it out of their goodness of their hearts.”
The last act of college involves a program called Pathways where funds and supplies are being collected on behalf of students who aren’t as well off as others.
“It’s a good spirit-building exercise internally,” says Graham. “And here (at the college) the teachers really care about the students. They are always looking out for the best interests of their students. This is one opportunity to help them directly.”
While the college is still finalizing what exactly they are going to do, there’s definitely going to be some “acts of college” which will stick around and be reoccurring in the future. There were a lot of positive vibes created.
“Overall, it was a good team building experience,” says Graham. “It’s clear that for some of the employees that it would have a positive impact on the college and the community (so they want to do them again).”

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Ryan Dahlman

Managing Editor