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Wednesday, 21 September 2011 15:08

Canada Border Services Agency highlights for August

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Submitted by Canada Border Services Agency
August was another busy month for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) at its border crossings throughout southern Alberta.


Here is what happened at four border crossings last month.

COUTTS:

At Coutts, the largest border crossing in Alberta, there were 24,769 vehicles, 13,860 commercial trucks, and 75,610 people processed for entry into Canada. Officers also processed 232 Permanent Resident applications, 76 work permits and 39 study permits to foreign nationals entering Canada.

Also, 54 people were refused entry and five people were arrested on outstanding warrants.

On Aug. 1, 2011, officers seized two opium poppy pods from a Montana resident. The contraband was concealed in a plastic bag under the driver’s seat. The drugs were seized and the man was refused entry into Canada.

On Aug. 7, Detector Dog Trooper helped officers find marijuana from a driver en route to Alaska. Trooper was called in to examine a truck in the examination bay and immediately detected an odour: he jumped inside the vehicle and tried to get to lower dash area on the passenger side. Officers opened the glove box and Trooper indicated to his handler immediately.

The handler reached inside the dash and found a water bottle filled with marijuana. Total weight was

62 grams valued at approximately $1,250. The driver was arrested and charged. A court appearance is scheduled in Lethbridge Provincial Court in November.

On Aug. 10, officers seized parts of a prohibited

AR-15 firearm and a sawed-off shotgun barrel.

Both firearms were deemed prohibited due to barrel lengths. The investigation continues and charges could be pending against two Alberta men.

On Aug. 14, a returning Alberta resident declared $1,000 in automotive parts, but officers found he failed to declare an additional $1,600 in automotive parts. The man said he did not declare them because he said they were not his and he did not think he had to declare goods that were for a friend.

On Aug. 20, two men from Georgia were driving two separate moving trailers for relatives and had no idea as to the trailers’ contents. Officers called one of the relatives to enquire about firearms. The man stated there were high capacity magazines in one of the trailers, but he did not know which one or how many. After searching the trailers, officers found and seized 11 high capacity magazines which are prohibited in Canada.

On Aug. 22, an Alaska resident was referred for examination on suspicion of firearms even though he declared no firearms or weapons. Officers noted a laundry basket full of dirty clothes on the passenger seat. One of the officers began to search inside the basket and found a fully-loaded .380 calibre pistol wrapped in a towel. The man was arrested and charged by RCMP. His vehicle was seized and he was issued a $1,000 penalty.

On Aug. 27, a U.S. man was refused entry for a prior conviction in the U.S.

On Aug. 28, officers intercepted a suspected impaired driver: the Alberta driver failed the roadside screening device. RCMP were called to attend.

On Aug. 29, a returning resident was importing a 2001 truck. The truck was hauling a flat deck gooseneck trailer with a 2011 truck on it.

While conducting their examination of the imported truck, officers noted the trailer did not have a licence plate and was purchased from the same dealer as the 2001 truck. The man said he had purchased the trailer several months ago and had towed it with his 2011 truck to the U.S., but when questioned about whether it was properly imported, the man became evasive and contradictory. Officers examined the trailer and the 2011 truck again and noted it would have been impossible to tow the trailer with that truck as there was no trailer hitch. The man finally admitted to purchasing the trailer on this trip. The trailer was valued at $10,345 and he was issued a $4,138 penalty for its return.

Also on Aug. 29, a returning resident had been absent for five weeks and declared $700 in goods for himself and his two children. He was referred for further exam to verify his declaration.

He explained to the examining officers he did not have any receipts for the goods he bought in the U.S., some goods he paid cash for, some goods were traded, and some he brought from Canada to the U.S. to sell or trade. Officers asked him what were the value of goods he paid cash for and he stated $7,000. The traveller then admitted he may have undervalued the goods. With the traveller’s co-operation, all goods were categorized and given a combined value of $29,402: $24,027 books; $4,452 cards/autographs and collectable photos; $1,397 clothes; $575 in CDs; and $95 in shoes. The traveller was issued a penalty of $7,384 for the duties and taxes evaded.

CARWAY

At Carway, the second largest border crossing in Alberta, there were 15,019 vehicles, 24 commercial trucks, and 37,772 people processed for entry into Canada. Officers also processed 246 Permanent Resident applications, 58 work permits and 18 study permits to foreign nationals entering Canada.

Also, 36 people were refused entry and two people were arrested on outstanding warrants.

On Aug. 4, a returning Alberta resident failed to declare more than $2,000 in goods including approximately $1,800 in clothing and accessories and $260 in tiles for a total of almost $400 in evaded duty and taxes.

On Aug. 6, a man was refused entry for a previous attempted murder conviction.

On Aug. 8, CBSA officers seized 16 firearms and

11 prohibited devices from a returning Canadian.

He was arrested and is facing numerous charges.

On the same day, officers intercepted a suspected impaired driver: the driver failed the roadside screening device. RCMP were called to attend.

On Aug. 22 a Montana man was refused entry for a manslaughter conviction.

On Aug. 25, four high-capacity magazines were seized from a returning resident. The man was issued a $500 fine for attempting to import the prohibited devices.

On Aug. 26, an Alberta couple stated they were returning from an overnight camping trip and declared $20 in merchandise. Officers were suspicious and referred them for further exam. When officers examined the trunk they found a lot of camping equipment, but concealed underneath it and the trunk liner were $2,900 in cosmetics the pair had purchased online. When confronted, one traveller stated she

did not think she had to declare goods that were purchased on the Internet. The goods were seized. The couple was issued a $720 penalty for their return.

DEL BONITA

On August 19, two Canadian residents were returning with a nine-year-old Washington resident. The child stated the men were friends and he had no idea how long he was staying in Canada, while one of the men stated he was the child’s grandfather. While there was a letter from the child’s father approving the travel, there were no documents from the child’s mother or a custody agreement. Officers made repeated attempts to validate the legitimacy of the child’s travel, but to no avail. The child was denied entry into Canada, the adults were instructed to secure proper documentation for the minor.

Officers alerted U.S. authorities to the attempted entry.

On Aug. 21, officers seized two brass knuckles and a replica .357 pellet revolver from a traveller.

CHIEF MOUNTAIN

On Aug. 15 officers seized a loaded .357 revolver from a Montana resident seeking to visit Waterton for the day. He was refused entry into Canada.

On Aug. 18 two travellers tried to smuggle 36.9 grams of marijuana on their day trip to Waterton. CBSA officers found a marijuana cigarette in the

dash of the vehicle and found more than 17 grams concealed within a cookie powder mix and 17 grams concealed inside a mason jar amongst various food items. The pair were refused entry into Canada.

On Aug. 28, CBSA officers found a loaded .032 caliber handgun in the rear body panel of a vehicle. The Colorado driver was visiting Waterton for the day. He was refused entry.

The Canada Border Services Agency is committed

to keeping our borders safe. Anyone with information about suspicious cross-border activity, should

contact the Border Watch Line at 1-888-502-9060.

For information on CBSA, phone 1-800-461-9999.

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