Thursday, 25 January 2018 04:47

Southern Alberta will get Premium view of Blue Moon Eclipse

Written by  Neel Roberts
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One of the most classic Alan Dyer Total Lunar Eclipse shots taken around 07:30 AM December 10th, 201n1. The bloodshot Moon in a  blue sky over the snow-covered Rockies reflects red tinted Lunar rays off the prairie surface and clouds.A close-up reveals the three Tau (Iota, 105 & 106) stars triangulating our largest satellite.  One of the most classic Alan Dyer Total Lunar Eclipse shots taken around 07:30 AM December 10th, 201n1. The bloodshot Moon in a blue sky over the snow-covered Rockies reflects red tinted Lunar rays off the prairie surface and clouds.A close-up reveals the three Tau (Iota, 105 & 106) stars triangulating our largest satellite. Provided by Neel Roberts

 Mark the dawn of Wednesday January 31st, 2018 for a spectacular Mountain Moon setting of the “Blue Moon” Eclipse.

 

While the Moon will actually be blood red, the Blue actually means the rarity of a 2nd Full Moon in the month and has nothing to do with color; hence “Once in a Blue Moon”. The peak is around 06:30 AM and is expected to remain blood red as it sets into a blue sky into the Rocky Mountains around 08:00 am. Most of the country won’t have this opportunity and many will be able to catch this before starting the day’s routine. You can see this with no visual aids but if you have binos or a scope, however if you want to go the extra mile, Astronomy Expert Alan Dyer has set up a special page on his website http://www.amazingsky.com/ called “to Photograph the Lunar Eclipse” https://amazingsky.net/2018/01/06/how-to-photograph-the-lunar-eclipse/. Whether you just want to get up close for that moment or photograph it to impress your friends, Royal Astronomical Society Canada (RASC) of Calgary member Alan Dyer’s knowledge will give you that edge
blue sky over the snow-covered Rockies reflects red tinted Lunar rays off the prairie surface and clouds.A close-up reveals the three Tau (Iota, 105 & 106) stars triangulating our largest satellite. 

Read 984 times Last modified on Thursday, 25 January 2018 04:56

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