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Thursday, 19 July 2012 10:35

Southwest Sask. farm receive little rainfall

Written by  Sask. Agriculture
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Saskatchewan livestock producers have 65 per cent of the 2012 hay crop cut and 42 per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report. Ninety-one per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality.


The estimated average hay yields on dry land are reported as 1.4 tons per acre (alfalfa and wild hay), 1.6 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome and other tame hay) and 1.9 tons per acre (greenfeed).
On irrigated land, the estimated average hay yields are 2.1 tons per acre (alfalfa), 2.3 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome), 2.4 tons per acre (other tame hay) and 2.6 tons per acre (greenfeed).
Warm and dry weather this past week has allowed for crops to advance quickly and most of them are in good condition. High temperatures and humidity have resulted in thunderstorms in some areas that produced varying amounts of precipitation. Disease, insects and wind are causing the majority of crop damage.
Cropland top soil moisture is rated as 18 per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 11 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate, 13 per cent short and one per cent very short.
Farmers are busy haying and controlling diseases and insects.
Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)
Precipitation in the area ranged from nil to 49 mm, with the majority of producers receiving very little rainfall. The Lisieux received 15 mm of rain, the Fife Lake area 3 mm, the Mortlach area 49 mm, the Chaplin area 8 mm, the Vanguard area 7 mm, the Swift Current area 5 mm and the Consul area 20 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 72 per cent adequate, 27 per cent short and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 69 per cent adequate, 27 short and four per cent very short. Many crop districts are reporting a large number of cropland, hay land and pasture acres to be short of moisture.
Livestock producers have 75 per cent of the hay crop cut and 49 per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay crop quality is rated as 18 per cent excellent, 66 per cent good, 13 per cent fair and three per cent poor.
High temperatures and humidity have stressed many crops, and additional rainfall is needed to help them through the rest of summer. Drought, wind, insects and disease have caused the majority of crop damage. Crop development has advanced quickly and there are indications that winter cereals and some pulses will be ready to be harvested in the coming weeks.
Farmers are busy haying, controlling disease in crops and getting harvest equipment ready.

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