Wednesday, 12 July 2017 16:13

Sask. Crop Report from June 27-July 3

Written by  Sask. Agriculture
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Haying is progressing in the province as livestock producers now have 19 per cent of the hay crop cut and 10 per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.  


Hay quality is rated as eight per cent excellent, 54 per cent good, 29 per cent fair and nine per cent poor. Pasture conditions are rated as six per cent excellent, 38 per cent good, 41 per cent fair, 13 per cent poor and two per cent very poor.
The majority of the province received very little rain this past week, ranging from negligible amounts in most areas to 78 mm in the Nipawin area. Many areas remain dry and producers are hoping for rainfall to boost crop development and hay and pasture growth.
Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 49 per cent adequate, 37 per cent short and nine per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 40 per cent adequate, 38 per cent short and 17 per cent very short.
Overall, crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year; however, there are some crops that are behind due to moisture issues. Twenty-six per cent of fall cereals are in the dough stage while nine per cent of spring cereals are in the heading stage. Two per cent of flax, 30 per cent of canola and mustard and 37 per cent of pulse crops are flowering.
Producers are wrapping up in-crop herbicide applications in most areas and starting to apply fungicides. While dry conditions are causing crop stress in most areas, particularly in the south, some areas in the north have issues with wet conditions. Crop damage this particular week was attributed to dry conditions, wind, insects, localized flooding and hail.
Producers are busy haying, scouting for disease and insects, hauling grain, fencing and repairing equipment.
SaskPower received eight reports of farm equipment coming in contact with power lines this week, bringing the total for June to 37. One hundred and seventy-six incidents have occurred so far in 2017.
Southwestern Saskatchewan:
Crop District 3ASW – Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN – Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B – Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas
Crop District 4 – Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas
Haying is underway and livestock producers now have 30 per cent of the hay crop cut and 20per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as four per cent excellent, 48 per cent good, 44 per cent fair and four per cent poor. Pasture conditions are rated as one per cent excellent, 16 per cent good, 65 per cent fair, 14 per cent poor, and four per cent very poor. The region received very little rain this past week, ranging from negligible amounts in most areas to 15 mm in the Limerick area. The Moose Jaw area, which received 5 mm this past week, holds the record for the most precipitation in the region since April 1 (125 mm). Many areas remain dry and producers are hoping for rainfall to boost crop development and hay and pasture growth.
Five per cent of the fall cereals are in the dough stage, while 17 per cent of the spring cereals are in the heading stage. Three per cent of the flax, 52 per cent of the canola and mustard and 44 per cent of the pulse crops are flowering. Across the region, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 24 per cent adequate, 55 per cent short and 21 per cent very short.
Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 12 per cent adequate, 47 per cent short, and 41 per cent very short.
Crop districts 3ASW (Rockglen area) and 3BS (Val Marie area) are reporting that 98 and 83 per cent, respectively, of cropland and 100 and 95 per cent, respectively, of hay land and pasture are either short or very short topsoil moisture. Crop District 4A (Maple Creek-Consul area) is reporting that 96 per cent of cropland and 100 per cent of hay land and pasture are either short or very short topsoil moisture.
In-crop herbicide application is wrapping up in most areas and fungicide application is beginning. Crop damage this week was attributed to dry conditions and wind.

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