Wednesday, 15 February 2017 11:17

What are your secret interests and what do they say about you?

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Most of us have secret interests. Fearing ridicule, we often try to hide this aspect of our personality.


What’s interesting is when a person allows their inner passions to become their outer passions.
Jim des Rivières is such a person.
By combining his interest in technology and insects, des Rivières has crafted a stunning visual experience called “Winged Tapestries: Moths at Large.”
The collection of 45 larger-than-life portraits of the much maligned insects is currently on exhibit at the Esplanade.
“I think of myself as a publicist of the moth,” des Rivières shared. “I think these creatures are absolutely stupendous and amazing.”
His purpose is to shatter the stereotype that moths are just brown blobs that eat clothes. Instead, they’re worthwhile and fascinating and Des Rivières states that certain species are more beautiful than butterflies.
He has the photos “of intricate shapes, structures and colours found on these insects” to prove it.
This Ottawa-based artist’s work is remarkable not only because it renders minute detail and texture, but because it introduces us to a new world — a world we don’t take time to see or appreciate. You don’t have to be into collecting insects to enjoy this display. des Rivières explained he wasn’t concerned with what people would think about his art because if nothing else he was sure the public would find the technical aspect of high-resolution images interesting. He uses a scanner to “photograph” his subjects and can capture much more detail than with most digital cameras.
As we see with this exhibit, if a person expresses their passion with enough conviction other people are invariably drawn in. Passion is contagious. 
Also on display at the Esplanade is the work of two other artists who’ve channeled their interests into creative endeavors.
For Joe Fafard, that interest is horses and cows; his favourite animals. An internationally-renowned artist, Fafard was born on a farm in Saskatchewan and sculpture connects him to his rural roots. Fafard’s work was featured on Canadian postage stamps in 2012. He’s also a member of the Order of Canada.
Koi Neng Liew’s experience of fatherhood is reflected in a display titled “Play-Thing.” Becoming a father allowed him to play with toys again and it’s led him to understand his young son sees toys as real. Because of this, Liew made large sculptures of toys, but gave them a human quality — they seem just as alive to viewers as to Liew’s child.
For des Rivières, Fafard and Liew, it’s clear there is more to be gained from freeing their passions than from hiding them in the shadows. Does the same apply to you?
For more information on the show, contact the Esplanade at 403-502-8580.
Dominique Liboiron is a speaker, author, teacher, journalist and photographer. To raise awareness about heart disease and to honour the life of one of its victims, Liboiron canoed from Saskatchewan to New Orleans. He is the first person to undertake that journey. He enjoys outdoor sports such as camping, hunting, fly fishing and canoeing. For more information about his speaking engagements, phone 306-661-8975 or visit www.canoetoneworleans.com.

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Dominique Liboiron

Dominique Liboiron is a speaker, author, teacher, journalist and photographer. To raise awareness about heart disease and to honour the life of one of its victims, Liboiron canoed from Saskatchewan to New Orleans. He is the first person to undertake that journey. He enjoys outdoor sports such as camping, hunting, fly fishing and canoeing.

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